Posts filed under ‘vegetarian’

Heavenly waffles

I bought a new waffle iron to make beglian waffles and soon realized that I couldn’t just use my all purpose pancake/waffle mix (which came out too heavy and dense). But this was the perfect time to try out a yeast waffle recipe. A quick googling got me to http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/belgian-yeast-waffles-recipe and it’s pretty easy. I had recently bought some organic cultured butter which was perfect for this. I whipped it together in the morning and made waffles for lunch and dinner. They are so light and crispy and fluffy in the center. I just picked it up by hand and ate them plain, they need nothing else.

The longer the batter sits the more it expands.

-L

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December 15, 2010 at 5:55 pm 9 comments

super crispy panko tempura

I fried up zucchini, portobello mushrooms, onion, and shishito peppers (not pictured).

tempura + panko = best of both

I was making Japanese curry (a recipe I never gotten around to posting). It’s a thick curry sauce served over rice usually with fried foods, more specifically panko breaded fried foods (like potato croquettes and shrimp). I fried up some spare veggies I had in the fridge.

I was trying to think of a way to get a super crispy light but crunchy coating. Then it hit me, instead of coating the veggies in egg then breading it, I was going to dip them in a thin tempura batter then coat them in panko. What I got was a study coating that did not turn soggy. (It’s important that the tempura batter is thin like heavy cream consistency, and NOT pancake batter.) I also didn’t lose most of the breading when it hit the hot oil (as I often get with an egg dip). The onion rings turned out especially well, the crispy exterior didn’t fall off with the first bite nor were the onions limp/overcooked.

I used a store bought tempura mix, it’s a huge time saver and I’ve never made it as good from scratch. Do check the ingredients, go for ones with the least amount of addictives and look for panko made without hydrogenated fats.

-Lina

October 9, 2010 at 12:01 am 1 comment

things from the garden

The garden yield a lot of cherry tomatoes, basil and cubanelle peppers (my bell peppers are few and slow growing). I haven’t been using my rosemary with all the basil around, rosemary will last far into autumn. Here I made a pesto with basil, garlic, walnuts, grapeseed oil, and a squeeze of lemon. I spread it on pizza dough coated in olive oil and push in the tomatoes. Since the pesto had no cheese it crumbled when you try to eat it but the flavors were amazing (you can add cheese to the pesto and it might hold together better). If I were to do it again I would fold the dough over the pesto and tomatoes.

I also made a gazpacho by blending the cherry tomatoes till it was liquid with a few cloves of garlic, a tablespoon or two of red wine vinegar, and a few pinches of salt and black pepper. I add in diced up cucumbers, onions, and bell pepper. Topped with lots of torn basil and some olive oil.

The photos make the peppers look large, these are like 5 inches long.

So far I’ve only gotten one pepper to red.

The black bell peppers are really small but cute and tasty. I’ve been throwing them in any dish that needs more veggies.

-Lina

August 26, 2010 at 5:46 am Leave a comment

tomatoes are in…

The first big haul.

The tomatoes are coming in fast, while there’s only three peppers out there now. They are so sweet I can just eat these tomatoes like fruit (yes they are fruit). Also great with a little olive oil, salt, black pepper, and basil.

When I plucked the purple pepper last week, it didn’t developed seeds yet. So maybe I was a little impatient, tho after plucking it started producing more buds. The pepper was very fruity, a little tart but not bitter in any way. I made a pasta salad with the first harvest.

First harvest

Pasta salad with herb infused oil

  • 2 1/2 cups fusilli pasta (cooked to desired texture in salted water)
  • 1 small onion (sliced thinly and rinsed)
  • 1 small bell pepper (diced)
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes (halved)
  • small bunch of basil (torn)
  • small bunch of thyme (or a few sprigs of rosemary)
  • 2 cloves garlic (crushed)
  • 1/3 (to 1/2) cup olive oil
  • 1 large lemon (zested then juiced)
  • small can of kippered herring or tuna or sardines (optional, you can also add cooked lentils or beans instead)
  • salt and black pepper

Heat up the olive oil over medium low heat with the thyme (either tied and remove later or strip the leaves into the oil), the basil torn into small pieces, and the crushed garlic. Simmer for a few minutes till it starts to smell fragrant and before the garlic turns dark . Put the pasta and everything into a large bowl, pour the oil and lemon juice (and zest) on top, toss together then salt and pepper to taste.

-Lina

July 11, 2010 at 3:06 pm 1 comment

austin eats part 1

I went to Austin this past weekend just to get away. It was relaxing and I had a great time. I’ll have to post about it next time, but I’ve taken part of a wellness/health program at my Drs. office and for the first two weeks, I can only eat fruits and veggies. For a girl that loves meat and rice and chocolate, it’s been tough. Luckily, Austin is quite health conscious and I found great food while there.

First stop on Saturday was brunch at Eastside Cafe with my cousin and her husband. I hadn’t seen them in years and they said this place had yummy food and the freshest veggies. The restaurant is cozy, dainty, and the service was excellent. They grow their own veggies in the garden out back, which you can stroll around in while you wait for your table, and they raise their own chickens. I believe all their veggies served come straight from the garden. As you sit down, they bring out these mini cornbread muffins and oh how delicious they smelled.

I had a mixed greens salad with goat cheese and tossed in a rice wine vinaigrette. It tasted so different from what I’ve had before. It tasted so fresh. No photo, but everyone’s seen a salad before.  But, what I loved most was their roasted acorn squash with a soy ginger sauce.

Doesn’t that look awesome? I just took a fork, scraped the side, dipped a bit and took a bite. It was so tasty and I was in love. My cousin’s husband ordered a veggie burger, but my cousin ordered this artichoke manicotti, which is “Carrot pasta filled with artichoke hearts, mushrooms, sun-dried tomatoes, pistachios, ricotta, and mozzarella cheese.  Topped with sun-dried tomato cream sauce and parmesan cheese.” I was jealous she got to eat that.

For the sake of a photo op, and because what kind of review is this without dessert? They were kind enough to eat this delicious cherry cobbler topped with vanilla ice cream. Aren’t they the sweetest? By the way, cherry cobblers and cherry pies are in my top 5 favorite desserts. I was brave and strong willed and did not falter. Behold.

As much as I wanted to take a bite of that, I couldn’t. Instead, I watched my cousin and her husband devour it. =( When I’m untubby and can eat that again, I’m coming back for sure. Haha! This is definitely a place to return to and Austinites, if you haven’t made it out to this place…GO!! They take reservations, prices are decent, and food is delicious.

– chelle

May 21, 2010 at 2:40 am 1 comment

Coconut cranberry muffins

Coconut is actually healthier than you think. Coconut fat won’t clog your arteries and your body will try to use up coconut oil (for energy) rather than storing it as body fat.

Coconut cranberry muffins

  • 1 can 14oz coconut milk (full fat)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup sugar (to 2/3 cup, if you prefer sweeter)
  • 1 c almond flour (or coconut flour)
  • 1/2 tsp almond extract
  • 2 cup flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • pinch of salt
  • 2/3 cup dried cranberries (or raisins)
  • 1 c flaked coconut (or sliced almonds)

Preheat oven to 350°F. Mix together wet ingredients with sugar. Then incorporate the flours, baking powder/soda, and salt. When the mixture is almost smooth, add in the dried cranberries. Scoop batter into lined or greased muffin tin, press in coconut flakes on top. Bake for 30 to 35mins till light golden brown. -Lina

December 19, 2009 at 1:17 am 2 comments

Curry quinoa lentils and brown rice

quinoalentilbrownrice

It’s the end of the month and I’ll push this one over the finish line. I like to get at least one post per month. This is healthy whole grains, high in protein, tasty, and way easy. And everyone should have a rice cooker.

Curry quinoa lentils and brown rice pilaf(?)

  • 2/3 cup quinoa
  • 2/3 cup brown rice
  • 1/3 cup lentils (any type that is whole with skin)
  • 1 tbsp curry powder
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 dried chili
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 1/2 cup water

quinoalentilbrownrice1

Wash and strain the grains, if you aren’t washing it then you’ll need more water (1/2 cup), but quinoa requires washing. Put everything in a rice cooker, and let it cook on regular.

If using the stove top, put everything into a small heavy bottom and bring to a boil with the lid on, then turn it down to a low simmer and cook covered for 35-40mins. Remove bay leaf and chili, give it a mix in the pot before serving.

You can use vegetable or chicken stock if you like, just watch the salt. This goes great with almost anything.

lina-sm-L

September 30, 2009 at 9:46 am 3 comments

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